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Bowery Capital Startup Sales Podcast

Bowery Capital is an early stage venture capital fund that focuses solely on helping portfolio companies with sales related challenges. This podcast is a discussion between the Bowery Capital team and experienced industry friends in an effort to help a younger generation of startups better understand the issues and pain points they will face when thinking about early revenue generation.
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Bowery Capital Startup Sales Podcast
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 21, 2017

In today’s episode, we host Conner Burt, COO of Lessonly, to discuss "Beyond Individual Contribution: Learning As A Sales Team," how sales teams can go beyond working day to day as individuals, and learn together as teams. Lessonly is modern team learning software used by over 650,000 learners at more than 350 companies to translate important work knowledge into Lessons that accelerate productivity. Sales teams across the world use Lessonly to reinforce best practices, accelerate rep performance, and close more deals. Support teams across the world use Lessonly to serve customers faster, drive consistent support, and elevate the customer experience. Lessonly empowers teams like those at Stripe, Birchbox, Modcloth, FiscalNote, Thumbtack and more to learn better day in and day out through their lesson building software, which makes Conner an expert on today’s topic. As we all know, sales is fiercely competitive and not just between competing companies. Often times the best reps will hoard their knowledge or simply keep it to themselves unless the culture around them supports and prompts learning together. As both a student and teacher of sales and learning cultures, Conner shares with us some ideas on how teams can break this conundrum and proactively and constructively learn together to sell better. This podcast is packed with tactical ideas and step by step suggestions here. Remember, the whole (of a sales team) is always greater than the sum of its individual (seller) parts.

Jul 13, 2017

This week, the Bowery Capital team hosted David Aronica, Business Development Manager at Splash to discuss “Hiring Your First BDR." Splash is an event marketing platform that enables users to create event experiences. The end-to-end Splash platform empowers users to create memorable event experiences through beautiful design, powerful planning and analysis tools, and meaningful integration of email marketing and social media. Splash enables brands like Facebook, Spotify, Salesforce and Anheuser-Busch to attract more of the right people, easily scale out their process and workflow, and capture the 1000's of data points every live event throws off, to inform future events and rest of your marketing mix. In today’s episode, David joins us to discuss hiring your first BDR. He initiated the conversation by providing his opinion on whether managers should spend more time training or hiring new BDR's. In the past, he's spent time hiring too many new BDR's, which led to layoffs due to the fact he didn’t have the time to train them and invest in his team. David discusses hiring veteran versus younger, millennial BDR's and what he sees as the ideal business development representative candidate. Initially, he hired veteran BDR's that he thought could fall in love with the product and wanted to move up quickly in the organization. He allows these more senior BDR's to see the metrics and parameters upon which they are ranked on per month. David goes on to discuss hiring millennial BDR's and the keys to managing them. David looks for solution-oriented, tenacious personalities that are coachable in these younger hires and he makes it his goal to embrace all individual learning styles as a manager. When it comes to both veteran and millennial BDR's, David believes that being completely transparent about expectations leads to relationships where new hires trust him and understand why he does what he does. He touches on the mistakes he's made in scaling out his teams in the past, among them: not training ramped up reps, not providing clarity around what it takes to get promoted, and only looking at numbers instead of investigating the deeper issue. David’s final thoughts on hiring your first BDR are to invest in them, since they are the future of your organization.

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